POMEGRANATE IN THE HOUSE IS VERY NICE (food, poetry)


POMEGRANATE IN THE HOUSE IS VERY NICE
Of the Seven Holy Species of plant pomegranate is the crown, the fertile one, the mystery, it is also one of the fruits of the Garden of Eden. The Seven Species indicates the plants given to ancient Israel. They are named in the Old Testament. They are: 1) Wheat, 2) Barley, 3) Grapes, 4) Figs, 5) Pomegranates, 6) Olives, 7) Date Honey or Dates. It is easy to see why these fruits and seeds are sacred species in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as they are staples in the world of flora that provide us with life and health. The pomegranate is symbolic of the 613 points in the Torah section of the Old Testament since it was believed the fruit bore 613 seeds. Solomon designed his crown based upon the bottom crown of the pomegranate. It is a shrub and can have as many as 40 or more fruit at at time during the growing season.
We see these Seven appearing throughout literature as being full of symbolic meaning in all of the ancient religions and iconography. We are exploring the pomegranate as our sole seed for Winter. It was the four pomegranate seeds Persephone consumed at the end of her stay with Hades in the underworld that brought about the Winter season while her mother, Demeter (Greek goddess of agriculture/wheat), mourned her absence.
The pomegranate is native to Persia and the Near East. It was planted along the Silk Road and has flourished in dry, hot growing regions all over the world including California and Arizona. The name of the pomegranate has significance also in war. The suffx ‘granate’ became the name of the Moor city in Spain, Granada. The grenade derived it’s name because the shape was like that of a pomegranate. For all things beautiful there is an opposite, and so for the pomegranate. We have sour syrup and sweet syrup, molasses and dried seeds (in curry), we have fun sweet eating seeds in November and sour ones for sauces in September and early October.
For we of the Southeast the pomegranate is best in November, December and January. It was a treat for us when we were children. My Mother called them “Plum Grannies” because it was just too much trouble to get pomegranate out of the mouths of Georgia native youngin’s and too easy to get the sweet seeds in. All it took was a bowl of cold water to separate the seeds from the pulp and a handful of napkins to separate the red from our hands. We were happy, still are when this fruit is at it’s sweetest.
The cocktail syrup, grenadine, is based upon the sweet pomegranate juice. We will be using a combination of pomegranate juice, grenadine, molasses, date palm sugar and red wine to make a kind of pomegranate molasses for pork and fish. The seeds are remarkable when sautéed with turkey breast steaks or chicken breasts. A sweet and salty spinach salad becomes a emblematic starter to any December holiday meal when the dressing contains pomegranate and bacon. I have had Turkish pomegranate syrup that was as thick as honey and deeply flavorful with tannins and sweet molasses as the same time; and then with that particular pomegranate thing that is between cranberries and scuppernongs.
They will sweeten in storage in the dry lower part of your refrigerator; keep the temperature between 32 and 42 degrees. If kept in your pantry at regular household temperatures between 65 and 72 degrees then they will keep for two months. Slightly score the outer skin of the fruit with a knife. Break it open over a bowl of cold water. Gently push the seeds off of the pulp. The pulp will rise and the seeds sink. They varieties (over 60) of pomegranate go from pale white sour seeds to super juicy sweet red seeds. We are most familiar with Wonderful and Grenada. Pomegranate juice is a known factor in reducing LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol). The juicy outer layer of the seed is called arils. And here is a new one to me; the shrub is so tannic that it has long been used in tanning leather, the bark and the leaves that is, not the fruit. Do not eat the pulp or skin.
HOT BACON AND POMEGRANATE SPINACH SALAD
Let’s explore the flavors of this healthy little shrub with a hot bacon spinach salad. The take is to use reduced pomegranate juice instead of balsamic vinegar or red wine vinegar in the dressing. Pop! Sweet then the fiber crunch again when we bite into the center of the aril.
I am of the belief that all holiday salads are good f0r the very reason that someone put some love and care into their salad, their opening gift to the meal. Even carrot and raisin salad is a treasure in the right home with the right people. For us, the red and green color in the salad is perfect as an even-handed salute to the holly and rose of Sharon.

4 slices hickory bacon, sliced and cooked
2 tablespoons minced white onion
1 teaspoon brown mustard
1/3 cup pomegranate syrup
1/3 cup Australian Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 tablespoons date palm sugar
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon the bacon fat
1/5 teaspoon granulated salt

Cook the bacon to crisp with the onion. Drain the fat and set aside. Put the bacon, onion, mustard and palm sugar into a large mixing bowl. Slowly whisk the syrup into the bowl to thicken. Again, slowly whisk in the olive oil, and then the rice vinegar. Over heat whisk this until it reaches 110 degrees, at this point continue beating the vinaigrette and add the bacon fat and 1/5 teaspoon salt. Keep warm
4 plates
5 ounces spinach leaves
40 pomegranate seeds
8 rings red onion
4 strawberries, sliced
20 almonds
Arrange the items onto the plate into sections of spinach, pomegranate, then the red onion and strawberries. Line the edges of the plate with the almonds. Pour the hot vinaigrette onto the plate just before serving so that it streaks the plate with sweet and sour goodness.
ROAST PORK WITH POMEGRANATE AND AGED CHEDDAR
Here we are roasting or grilling in a kettle/ceramic grill. The cheddar has to be an aged white cheddar, no yellow. You can use Irish Porter Cheddar for a more dramatic effect as this cheese basically “rocks!”. In the even you cannot find the Irish then we are using aged white cheddar. Fruit and cheese are good anywhere. Pomegranate, pork and cheese are even better because Wonderful pomegranate is just that good.
Malta is a great little Island beverage that is brewed malt, cane and corn sugars and purified water. It is earthy, think the smell of turned black dirt, that good. Like spring plowing or the turning of a small garden space.
I have found Malta to be great in barbecue sauces and marinades for things as all American as a pork rib to tongue and liver. Malta is very versatile, and when combined with pomegranate juice it deepens the flavors even more to where the pomegranate really does resemble a rich rum infused molasses. Next time you see it in the store do not pass it by, stop, get a six pack and taste what more you an do to make the ordinary into the extraordinary.
Recipe serves four.
2 pounds pork loin, boneless
2 teaspoons Chinese Five Spice powder
1 lime zested
3 tablespoons walnut oil
1 tablespoon Sichuan pepper, ground
1 teaspoon allspice, ground
¼ cup as real soy soy sauce as you can find (no wheat)
1 cup washed and chopped leeks, white to pale green
½ cup chopped celery, leaves, ribs and all
7 ounces malta
5 ounces pomegranate juice

4 ounces aged white cheddar cheese
40 pomegranate arils

Rub the pork loin with the soya sauce and then with the walnut oil. Chill for 15 minutes. Combine the lime zest, 5 Spice, allspice, salt and pepper and rub into the pork so that it is evenly coated. Cover with the leeks and celery. Turn the oven onto 325 degrees. Roast for 45 minutes, the internal temperature will be 150 degrees when it is ready. Baste with the malta and pomegranate juice while it cooks.
Remove from oven and strain the juices into a saucepan. Turn the heat the medium high. Add 2 tablespoons molasses and 2 tablespoons brown sugar. Continue cooking until it has reduced by half and has thickened. I seriously prefer date palm sugar and black strap molasses in this dish, the brown sugar will make it more syrupy though, and it needs to stick to the pork like a glaze. If you need to enrich the flavor of this then add grenadine or if you have access to a Mid East/Turkish grocer then buy a half liter of pomegranate molasses. The Turkish style is very thick and earthy as they use a different kind of pomegranate for this syrup. I find that a very small amount goes a long way.
Please, dice two sweet potatoes, one onion, and place them on aluminum foil. Slice 4 ounces of butter and place over the potatoes. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of cardamom and 1 teaspoon of salt over the potato. Roll the aluminum foil into a tight cylinder. Bake in the same oven as the pork loin.
Chop 2 cups of leaf lettuce and sauté with a teaspoon of corn oil and then steam with 2 tablespoons of chicken stock. It is very simple.
Slice the pork loin into 16 slices. Divide pork, potatoes and lettuce between the plates. Glaze the pork with the reduction. Shave the cheese over the pork and then garnish with pomegranate.

CHICKEN TENDERS WITH POMEGRANATE AND BASMATI RICE
We are on the stovetop for this one. I like to cook it in a wok but a regular iron skillet or stainless steel pan is good as well. Chicken or turkey tenders are equally delicious for this dish. If you want fish then I highly recommend Alaskan black cod steaks. Sablefish/ black cod is one of the finest fish in the Alaskan waters, firm, white meat, a bit buttery and sweet.
Basmati rice smells like nuts when it is cooking. You do not need much seasoning at all for this rice. Just water, butter and salt. I love the smell of basmati rice cooking but if rice that smells like almonds and hazelnuts roasting turns you off then use the more floral Jasmine rice, and it that disturbs your sense of taste then the next option is Cal Rose rice, a very straight forward fat medium sized grain that is a standard to Chinese the world over; and they are right because Cal Rose is the best everyday rice I have ever had.
Brussels sprouts cooked with bacon and red bell peppers makes this little dish something to remember. Brussels sprouts cooked this way are better than you may remember little cabbages to taste. Don’t let this superb vegetable get away from you during the winter months. It is one of the great green veggies. When cooking Brussels sprouts you will boil them and then sauté them with the bacon and peppers. The boiling softens and lets the salt and bay leaf flavor into the body of the vegetable.Serves four.
24 ounces chicken tenders
½ cup sweet potato starch
½ cup all purpose white flour
½ teaspoon coriander, ground
½ teaspoon cumin, ground
1/3 teaspoon ground black pepper
½ teaspoon pink sea salt
2 ounces butter
1 ounce extra virgin olive oil
4 tablespoons Tiger Sauce (off the shelf, it is great)
¼ cup pomegranate juice
40 pomegranate arils
20 pomegranate arils crushed
20 leaves cilantro
Mix the sweet potato starch and flour together. Mix the spices together. Roll the chicken tenders in the spices and press them into the meat. Heat a large pan on medium high heat. Roll the tenders in the flour/starch. Dust off. Melt the butter in the pan and add the oil when it foams. Turn heat to medium. Then add the chicken piece by piece. Turn as the meat begins to turn light brown on each side. Remove from heat and pat the oils off. Set on plates and add cilantro leaves.
Heat the Tiger sauce, pomegranate seeds and crushed pomegranate on medium high heat in the same pan you cooked the tenders in. Scraped the bottom of the pan to get the good flavor remains from the chicken. Deglaze with soda water. Stir. Add a 1/3 teaspoon roasted chili paste and stir some more. When it has combined and has a uniform flavor and texture pour it over the chicken tenders.
Serve with Brussels sprouts and basmati rice and enjoy the very lively flavors of this mysterious dish. The mystery is in the way that all the strong flavors become a dignified point of delicious! Thank you very much and I do wish you the most beautiful of holidays in these Winter Georgia days and nights.
One day
Chill cold wet windy and chaotic
And the next day a song of finches
And thrushes sunning in the warm
December weather.
I remember skateboard Christmases
Rolling down Brown Road
On home made skate boards that broke
More often than they made the grade.
A jump over the bushes and the world
Changed to wilderness in the easement
Between Ball Park, North Park and Oak Avenue.
Chasing squirrels with Bear bows
And pump action pellet guns,
Wading the thing called a creek into Tucker Lake,
And walking out on the thing ice,
Spider web cracks and the echo of coming trouble,
Lay down and spread eagle slide to safety,
Fake fly to safety going home.
Home seems to be where I am always going.
To a warm hearth and steaming bowls of rice,
To hot Sleepy Time tea with sourwood honey,
To my family that I am always dreaming of,
To a place where I want to share all
Of the passions, the expressions,
The smiles and laughter of a life lived leading to today.
Leading to home to the heart that is yours,
Your heart beating a song that will embrace,
Your dark eyes that reflect and absorb,
That give so much more than any could deserve,
But there you are, Home, love, my love,
Beloved voice that has always been with me,
In childhood and as a man,
Beckoning me to seek the passion,
To seek this place that is you and me.

A MAN AND HIS GRILL


ALL THINGS CONSIDERED,

A MAN AND HIS GRILL NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE.

A LIFE WITH DUCK, SALMON, AND CHEESEY BEEF

Every five years or so things change in subtle ways where we wonder what happened and how come this or that no longer fits the scene described in magazines and talk shows. Food fads change faster now than ever before. I watched and worked through the dark hours of the culinary world when nouvelle and cuisine mincuer ravaged the landscape of the collective unconscious of chefdom and left the diner curious as to where the food went and why what remained was so high priced. That’s what prescribed fashion will do for you when there is no firm basis to hold the image for more than the flash of a celebrity chefs smile. The restaurant, as champion of taste, was almost run over by corporate downsizing as a result of the backlash to the way food was handled from the late 1980s until the last five years. In honor of the history of food we will celebrate around the grill with duck breast, salmon steak, and a tenderloin of beef.

We are in a boom time of dining now and it is the task of every cook, chef and home cook to test, taste and experiment wisely because if we are not careful then the closings, corporate takeovers and general rip off for the consumer will surely ensue. What to do? Be honest. That’s all it takes. Just be honest to your plate, to your customer, to your family and friends and the best of the new foods. Fashion and flash will rise to the top and we will again be on a culinary adventure as wonderful as the one set forth by California cuisine in 1980, and then again by Fusion in the late 1990s. That’s what fashion does for us in the culinary world, it takes us on an upward spiral of curiosity and conquest where the best of our challenges become new standards and the worst becomes a joke about ‘what were we thinking.’ Even the dishes that don’t work out so great can still be fun. Remember, live to eat, and do so with full heart. OK, so let’s go stand around the grill and think about foods that last and things that bind our world together.

The duck breast and salmon will both be marinated. The beef tenderloin will be rubbed with garlic and coarse sea salt and finished with melted Gorgonzola cheese. This is a low carbohydrate delight of a meal… almost. It is all only meat but we will have fruit juices in the marinades. The duck is a new recipe, the salmon is a new standard, and the beef is as old as country clubs and dirty martinis. If you do not drink don’t be afraid of the alcohol in these marinades. They are only marinades for the flavor, the alcohol cooks out on the grill and all you have then is the refined flavor of sour mash corn and aged grapes.

DUCK BREAST

We are using the more familiar Pekin duck, which has a low fat content and is lighter colored meat than the huskier, fattier, and burgundy flavored Muscovy duck of fine restaurants. You can find whole ducks in the frozen section of all the grocery stores. Ask ahead about duck breasts to see if the grocer can get it in for you. If this is not possible then buy the whole duck, cut it in half and then in portions of breast, leg and thigh with the bone intact. Marinade the same as with boneless breasts. The cook time will be a little bit longer. The good thing about duck is that you can cook it to temperatures the same as with beef. Medium rare duck grilled this way is a very, very tasty treat.

If you are ever in the mood for some of the best Hong Kong style duck you can eat in Athens then contact Fooks Market on Baxter Street and ask when she is getting it in. Usually it is Thursdays and there are a lot of requests for this kind of Chinese Barbecue duck so get your order in early so that they can have it ready for you to pick up after work.

2, 8 ounce                                     duck breasts, boneless

1 cup                                                cranberry-raspberry juice

1/3 cup                                    soy sauce

1/3 cup                                    Chianti

1/3 cup                                    sesame oil

2 tablespoons                        allspice, ground

1 tablespoon                                    ginger, ground

1 tablespoon                                    cinnamon, ground

1 teaspoon                                    cayenne pepper, ground

Combine liquid ingredients and spices. Place duck breasts skin side down in glass dish. Pour marinade over the duck breasts, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 24 hours.

SALMON

When this marinade first appeared twenty years ago it was considered radical. Funny how time changes things. The salmon really does have to be Pacific Ocean King, Coho, Sockeye, Silver Bright (chum), and Pink salmon. These fish are part of what made the West Coast possible and their value to nature is matched on a level with shrimp, sardines, krill and on up to the mighty mackerel family. Wild salmon is to be cooked to any desired temperature from rare to medium. If you should cook the fish over medium it will lose the moist texture and taste of the sea. Well-done salmon has that chalky and fishy texture that unpleasantly lingers around. Try not to go over medium with fresh salmon that is labeled sushi or sashimi grade. Most frozen wild salmon is immediately frozen when it is butchered so it is safe for rare and medium rare temperatures. Did you know that salmon in sushi restaurants is almost always from frozen stock? The freezing kills off a lot of bacteria and retains the moisture and fat necessary for the best tasting sushi. Unless you are right on the water or the fish is no more than two days old this is the best way to have it for sushi. I have eaten sushi salmon right out of the ocean and it tastes the way you would expect velvet to taste. The miracle of air transit, UPS and Federal Express really do make it possible for the home cook to get seafood of the same grade as restaurants.

Hint, wild salmon does not have dyes or injected hormones and antibiotics as do the farmed Atlantic variety. Also, wild Pacific salmon is a vital part of our oceans whereas Atlantic salmon farmed in the Pacific Ocean is a threat to our oceans. You will also notice an extreme taste difference between the wild and farmed species. Farmed is cheaper and more readily available, and that is the only advantage over wild salmon. Georgia used to have Atlantic salmon in our rivers but that is a story long ago before the Savannah River plant. Sometimes the plight of our oceans and rivers seems bleak, but with studied and optimistic approaches to preserving and renewing the life of our waters we can see a revitalization of our waters. After all, Australia recently declared the entire Great Barrier Reef as a preserve. This means that the living coral can be protected from commercial and recreational destruction. Also, the rivers of Northern California, Oregon, Washington Western Canada and Alaska are all being marked for greater protection from chemical plants and irrigation runoff, dams (from being overheated and the addition of water steps for the salmon to make it upstream), and with seeding inland areas of the rivers with salmon eggs so that they have a greater chance of filling our oceans and tables with this highly necessary part of our diet, the wild salmon. Wild salmon swim up waterfalls. What is great than that in the fish kingdom?WHERE TOSHOP? Earthfare, Publix, Kroger, and I have even seen whole sockeye salmon (frozen) at Wal-Mart. Ask your grocer when it is coming in, and if they can reserve the best for you. They will do what you want; all you have to do is ask.

2 pounds                                    Pacific Ocean salmon

1/2 cup                                    Kentucky Bourbon

1/3 cup                                    Molasses, unsulphured black strap

1/3 cup                                    Leas and Perrins Worcestershire Sauce

1/4 cup                                    corn oil

2 tablespoons                        Cracked black peppercorns

Combine the liquid ingredients and the pepper. Place the boned salmon into a glass dish. Pour the marinade over the fish, cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours but not more than six hours.

If you want to add a more island and vacation style feel to your Pacific salmon then pierce it with rosemary stalks and grill on top of thin slices of pineapple. Even if you don’t want the pineapple part try out the rosemary.

It’s one of my favorite additions to grilled salmon.

BEEF            THE AMERICAN PROTEIN KING

Next up in our protein feast is beef. Not chicken and not pork (they are for later summer grills), but beef, king of the West and the engine of our trail blazing manifest destiny. I use two kinds of beef, grass fed drug free and lean, which comes from various ranches in the US and Australia. The other is American grown Kobe. Kobe is the greatest of all possible beef and is raised in an environment of being corn fed, taken for short walks, no drugs or hormones, and is the richest beef you will ever eat. The Kobe that I buy is raised at a ranch by the name of Wagyu. There are other Kobe ranches in the US but this is my favorite. When buying beef, as with all foods read the labels and ask questions. Not all foods that are good for you are overly expensive, you just need to shop well and shop often for what you want. When the demand is there your grocer will meet that demand without overcharging you.

Meat thermometers are relatively inexpensive and readily available on the market. Buy one or two so that you always have it around. To set the thermometer to correct temperature insert it into a glass of ice with just enough water to cover the ice. The temperature will be 32 degrees.

Here is a temperature scale for red meat:

VERY RARE:            115, red cold with just a little brown on the edges

RARE:                        116 to 120, cold red center, light gray edges

MEDIUM RARE:   121 to 13o, warm red center

MEDIUM:      131 to 145,warm, bright pink center

MEDIUM WELL:   146 to 155, pink hot center, mostly gray

WELL:      156 to 160, gray all the way throughout the meat

MEAT AND THE MARINADE

4 six ounce                                    beef tenderloin filets

3 tablespoons                        coarse sea salt

2 tablespoons                         ground black pepper

2 tablespoons                        ground garlic

3 ounces                                     extra virgin olive oil

4 ounces                                    Gorgonzola cheese

(Melt the cheese on steaks during the last three minutes of cooking)

Mix the salt, pepper and garlic with the oil. Rub the filets in the oil and let them set for thirty minutes. When it is time to grill make sure that there is still pepper and garlic on the steak.

ABOUT BLUE AND GREEN VEINED CHEESES

Cheese production is one of the more interesting conventions of the food trade that is prominent in our diet yet also little understood. There are three primary ways of ripening cheese.  Keep in mind that the process of making cheese is like that of certain grains and grapes, in that cheese is made by a system of controlled and limited spoilage. The simplest way for me to present these ways of incorporating the penicillin are cheddar, blue and Brie. Blue and greened veined cheeses become what they are by the injection of penicillium roqueforti into the center of the cheese part way through the aging process. Cheddar and Swiss type cheeses are cured with a mold mixed in with the starter, and Brie style cheeses are cured with the bacteria from the outside of the formed cheese. So, blue from inside, regular throughout, and Brie from the outside for the bacteria in the curing process. If Brie has a slight ammonia scent that means that it is over-ripe and should not be purchased.

We are using Gorgonzola for the beef. Gorgonzola is a green veined cheese. It is softer than traditional blue cheese, and the way it crumbles is in larger chunks than blue or feta cheeses. There is salt in cheese so if your diet is strict about salt then limit your cheese intake. Cheddar cheese is salted from the beginning in the started curd. Swiss type cheeses are salted in brine for up to two weeks during the curing process. Feta style cheeses are heavily salted (pickled actually) so that the microbe growth is almost halted, hence the chalky and salty texture of dry feta. Parmesan is salted by rubbing it on the outside of the rind, and if it is overly salted and allowed to cure too long in the salt it will dry out. I have this problem of too dry Parmesan just a few times where I was unable to cut through a 30-pound block because it was simple too tight and dry as a result of inattention during the curing process. I tried to explain the problem to my purveyor and he had no idea what I was talking about. Again, it is good to be informed so that you what is wrong or right with your food and what to do depending on the condition of the product. The best Parmesan will be slightly salty and just moist enough to stick to your fingers when grated. That’s all the information today on cheeses.

The grill and the charcoal used. I mostly use hickory. Hickory is the standard for slow, smoky, full flavored grilling and bbq smoking. Mesquite is the most popular for fish and chicken because it cooks at a higher temperature and the smoke flavor is less defined than hickory. Fruit tree charcoals like apple and cherry are excellent for smoking and for water smoke grilled meats like poultry and game. I have used coconut charcoal for really fast high heat grilling, which is great for oily fish like wild salmon and mackerel varieties.  Pecan is great mixed with hickory chips. If you are looking for mixing it up with grilling and smoking by raising the grill screen and closing the lid during cooking then use mixes of charcoal and wood chips. Soak the wood chips at least five hours or overnight for the smokiest and slowest heat.

Use hickory for this combination of meats. If you have a banana leaf, or need to buy one do so at Fooks Market or Wal-Mart (strangely enough!). Cactus leaves are available in just about all the markets. Why do I mention these leaves?

You can lay the banana leaf over the duck and salmon while they cook to hold the smoke in while keeping the meat moist. The cactus leaf is great for putting over the beef while it grills to add extra seasoning to the meat, and also to set the beef on after it has cooked to keep it from burning on the grill. Cactus leaf is tasty and there are no pins and needles in the ones in the grocery store sold for eating so don’t fret about that sticky problem. Banana leaves can be reused so don’t throw it away.

Remember that you have to keep each area of the grill clean and distinct from the other so that the meat flavors do not interfere with each other. Nothing worse than fishy tasting beef and that can be avoided by keeping the grill clean with a grill brush. The fastest to grill is the salmon so cook it last. Duck is the slowest at 20 minutes and one and half-inch to two inch thick meat is in between at about fifteen minutes.

You will need a pound of hickory charcoal, and a pound of hickory chips soaked in hot water. Oil the grill screen with corn oil by rubbing a corn oil soaked towel on the grill screen/rack. When the charcoal has turned gray add the water soaked chips. When the coals have started to turn color put the duck on the grill. After ten minutes turn on the duck, place the beef tenderloin filet on the grill and cook for five minutes, turn both meats. Add more hickory chips and then place the salmon on the grill. Cover with the banana leaf, or close the grill and let it all smoke for a few (three) minutes. Raise the cover and check to see that the heat is not too hot by holding your hand five inches over the grill screen. You should be able to hold it there for about thirty seconds, if longer then the coals are too cool, if shorter then they are too hot. All of the meats will have been turned 3 times for complete cooking. Remember to put the cheese on the beef for the last three minutes of cooking so that it melts into the meat. Check the meats with your thermometer so that the meat is cooked to your desired temperature.

If you want grilled vegetables with this meal think corn, peppers, onions, and squash. After it has all cooked divide the meats among the plates and dig in for a fun bbq in the backyard or on the deck. What’s more fashionable than being friends or family and just having a good time being together in the early evening?


GRILLING MY LIFE AWAY

Sometimes a warm summer night is all we need

To see how beloved this Southern life can be,

For me it’s how I cherish, how I care and prepare,

For others it’s just the way the day crawls by,

How we sit and chat and watch the flowers in the breeze,

And any way you slice it there’s no better way to live

Than passing the time on a sun porch in June,

It’s one of those things my Mother taught us all,

To love the life we live and to share this love with everyone.

And if you don’t believe, well, gather round the grill

And start talking about the world,

Pour a tall glass of sweet orange pekoe tea,

And tell me, can you feel the urge to tell history and myth?

Can you feel the desire to hold your loved one?

Can you tell her she is beautiful in the glow

Of a hickory smoke fire at sunset?

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𝓡. 𝓐. 𝓓𝓸𝓾𝓰𝓵𝓪𝓼

𝙳𝚛𝚎𝚊𝚖 𝚋𝚒𝚐! 𝙻𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚋𝚒𝚐𝚐𝚎𝚛!

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hotfox63

IN MEMORY EVERYTHING SEEMS TO HAPPEN TO MUSIC -Tennessee Williams

My Cynical Heart

Welcome to my world.

Discobar Bizar

Welkom op de blog van Discobar Bizar. Druk gerust wat op de andere knoppen ook, of lees het aangrijpende verhaal van Harry nu je hier bent. Welcome to the Discobar Bizar blog, feel free to push some of the other buttons, or to read the gripping story of Harry whilst you are here!

the poet's billow

a resource for moving poetry

MY TROUBLED MIND

confessions are self-serving

proletaria

politics philosophy phenomena

Poems for Warriors

"But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain..." 1 Cor. 15:10

LUNA

Pen to paper

Dirty Sci-Fi Buddha

Musings and books from a grunty overthinker

Sircharlesthepoet

Poetry by Charles Joseph

susansflowers

garden ponderings

𝓡. 𝓐. 𝓓𝓸𝓾𝓰𝓵𝓪𝓼

𝙳𝚛𝚎𝚊𝚖 𝚋𝚒𝚐! 𝙻𝚒𝚟𝚎 𝚋𝚒𝚐𝚐𝚎𝚛!

Flutter of Dreams

Dreaming in Music and Writing by Mel Gutiér

RhYmOpeDia

Immature poet imitate...but the mature one steal from the depth of the heart

hotfox63

IN MEMORY EVERYTHING SEEMS TO HAPPEN TO MUSIC -Tennessee Williams

My Cynical Heart

Welcome to my world.

Discobar Bizar

Welkom op de blog van Discobar Bizar. Druk gerust wat op de andere knoppen ook, of lees het aangrijpende verhaal van Harry nu je hier bent. Welcome to the Discobar Bizar blog, feel free to push some of the other buttons, or to read the gripping story of Harry whilst you are here!

the poet's billow

a resource for moving poetry

MY TROUBLED MIND

confessions are self-serving

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